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11:00 AM – 7:00 PM Registration Opens
6:30 AM – 7:45 AM Golf Breakfast on Course
7:45 AM – 1:00 PM Golf Tournament
5:30 PM – 6:45 PM Hors d’oeuvres Reception Hosted by Infinity
5:30 PM Exhibit Hall Opens – Fiesta Ballroom

Opening Plenary

7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

 

199. From Sobriety to Recovery: Quenching the Thirst for Wholeness
Rokelle Lerner, BS
Supported by: Crossroads Centre Antigua

Level of Instruction: All

The thirst for alcohol can be compared to men and women’s thirst for wholeness and a hunger for the sacred. One often self medicates in an effort to escape the present moment, numb their pain or avoid the “void” in their soul. In order to experience the miracle of recovery addicts need practical tools that will allow them to nourish their spirit and show up for their lives. This lecture will explore the topic of mindfulness and compassion in recovery and offer tools that will allow recovering addicts to embrace their birthright of serenity and wellbeing.

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:30 AM – 7:00 PM Registration Opens
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

Opening Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

200. Treating Chronic Pain During the Opioid Epidemic
Mel Pohl, MD, DFASAM
Supported by: Las Vegas Recovery Center

Level of Instruction: All

Chronic Pain occurs as a complicated web of emotions and physical symptoms. The most common way to treat pain is to use opioid medications, which actually complicate the course of chronic pain. For some individuals who develop dependence/ addiction to these medications, management and treatment for their condition can become much more complicated. This session will review the interactions of pain, suffering and addiction as they interface in your clients with suggestions for intervention and treatment.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Monday Mid-Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

210. PsychoNeuroPlasticity and Addiction Recovery
Dr Barbara S. Peavey, Laura Martinez, LCDCI

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Principles and practices of psychoneuroplasticity in addiction treatment will be explained. Intentionally adding dimensions of brain health will be explained, as well methods of brain training to help heal, enliven, and direct the brain will be covered.

 

211. Conquering Compassion Fatigue & Burnout: Build Resilience, Intervene with Passion, Make an Impact
Margaret Nagib, PsyD
Supported by: Timberline Knolls

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Research indicates that some level of compassion fatigue is normal and inevitable in the helping fields. This presentation will provide education on the nature of compassion fatigue, burnout, and secondary trauma; describe the importance differences between the three and help the practitioner build resilience preserving passion and maximizing impact.

 

212. Impact of Integrative Health on Addiction Treatment
Philip Hemphill, PhD, LCSW

Level of Instruction: All

The impact of Integrative Health in addiction treatment requires the identification and treatment of both behavioral and medical conditions. This process involves screening, consultation, and intervention in a coordinated manner that promotes health and wellness. The importance of creating strategies for increasing both patient and staff literacy with a phased in activation will be presented with case examples. Data from this process of implementation will be provided for discussion as well as a model of care. Finally, an assessment of your organizations readiness with fidelity scales will be provided for enhanced commitment to patient care.

Monday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

 

250. Internet Addiction: Epidemiology, Etiology, and Treatment Considerations
Dr. David Neil Greenfield, PhD, MSCP

This workshop will attempt to address the theory, research, and clinical/treatment issues associated with Internet Addiction and Internet Use Disorder. There will be an introduction to the etiology, neurobiology, epidemiology and clinical/treatment implications of managing this growing process-addiction. We will also discuss some of the broader psychosocial and neurobehavioral aspects of the Internet as a mood-altering behavior and how the unique characteristics of the Internet promote compulsive use and addictive patterns. We will also discuss the specific addictive aspects of the Smartphone, along with distracted driving. Time permitting, we will review treatment strategies; Q&A.

Monday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 

251. Addiction Interaction Disorder and Relapse
Eric John Webber, MA, CADC, ASAT, CCPG
Supported by: Caron Treatment Center

This Presentation provides a general examination of addiction interaction disorder and the specific impact on the relapse process. Behavioral addictions such as sex addiction, gambling disorder, and workaholism will be examined in some detail, while broader looks at food/eating, technology, and money issues will also be included. A review of the ASAM definition of addiction, how various behavioral addictions fit this definition, and a discussion of their manifestations will lead into a discussion of how the addiction interaction process leads to a process of return to chemical use. Discussion will also focus on the interaction of chemical use and behavioral addictions in active addiction in the areas of replacement, fusion, ritualization, cross tolerance, and alternating cycles. A look at assessment and treatment approaches in various levels of care will close the training. Some of the assessments to be discussed will be the SOGS, GA20, Lie/Bet Questionnaire, SAST and SDI.

 

252. Motivational Interviewing in the Treatment of Substance Use Disorders
Dr. Peter Musser
Supported by: Ashley Addiction Treatment

This workshop will introduce participants to the theoretical basis and tenets behind Motivational Interviewing (MI), a humanistic, client-centered intervention style based on the Transtheoretical Model (stages of change) of behavior change. Dr. Musser will compare pre-existing theoretical models and how MI techniques can enhance interventions to facilitate behavior change in sometimes resistant clients. He will also discuss strategies for incorporating MI among diverse client populations and issues.

 

253. Evolving Landscape of Adolescent Addiction Treatment
Ronald D. Porterfield, LPC-MHSP, NCC; Caleb J. Vogtner, M.A.
Supported by: Cumberland Heights

The primary focus on this presentation is treating addicted adolescents. The presenters will draw from years of experience in working with this population in a residential setting. The content of which will include: current trends in substance abuse, the impact of today’s technology culture (social media, smart phones, gaming), strategies to connect with the adolescent , developing therapy groups that engage the teen, successful implementation of Twelve Step fundamentals that can be grasped by the teen, addressing co-occurring issues such as grief, trauma, depression and anxiety, interventions that include the family and the community and counseling with strategies to support long-term recovery.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Monday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

 

275. Trauma, PTSD, EMDR, and the Mind: Use of the Grief Model in Healing Traumatic Experiences
Cynthia Westcott
Supported by: Onsite

Based on the work of Bessel van der Kolk, Peter Levine, Robert Schear, Lorie Dwinell and Jane Middelton Moz, and others, we will explore 1. How traumatic experiences as well as grief and loss are registered as psychological injury and encoded in the brain in a similar fashion; 2. How the ‘stages’ of grief effectively describe the subjective experience of feeling, emotional, and cognitive states as an individual grieves a variety of usual and unusual life experiences; 3. What internal and external support and anchoring is most helpful or even necessary for successful grieving to occur.

 

276. The Female Brain: Implications for Recovery
Jeff Georgi, M.Div, MAH, LPC, LCAS, CCS, CGP Clinical Director Georgi Educational & Counseling Services Consulting Associate in the Division on Addiction Research and Translation at Duke University Medical Center
Supported by: Lakeview Health

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This presentation will provide an overview of the emerging information that identifies the unique aspects of the female brain and the significance of limbic resonance giving a biological foundation for the relational nature of treatment and recovery. Specific attention will be given to both the strengths and vulnerabilities of women with substance use disorders. Despite the growing attention to gender sensitive treatment, far too many models of treatment still find their theoretical foundations in the male experience. However, the field is changing. Utilizing the works of Louann Brizendine, M.D., Nancy Andreasen, M.D., PhD, Robert Sapolsky, PhD, and other important neuroscientists, participants will review the neuro-hormonal aspects of the female brain. Special attention will be given to the neurological impact of a woman’s dynamic hormonal changes throughout her life cycle and the ramification of these changes for her treatment and sustained recovery.

 

277. Integrating a Wellness Model in Addictions Counseling
Devona M. Stalnaker-Shofner, EdD in Counselor Education and Supervision, Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in the State of Georgia; Melissa Chickering, MLADC, LCMHC

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Wellness is an integral part of the counseling profession. As such, incorporating client wellness into a recovery plan is vital. This workshop focuses on how to integrate wellness as a part of a recovery plan and overall treatment utilizing Myers and Sweeney’s (2005) Indivisible Self Wellness (IS-Wel) Model. In doing so, this offers a more holistic approach to addictions treatment and extends the recovery model beyond a mere focus on abstinence and change to include key lifestyle and personal factors that can be essential elements to sustaining recovery.

Young People in Recovery Workshop

6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

CORE Tennis Tournament and Dinner

6:00 PM – 9:00 PM

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:30 AM – 7:00 PM Registration Opens
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

Tuesday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

300. Opioid Antagonist Therapy
Chapman Sledge, MD

Antagonist therapy is a useful adjunct in the treatment of opioid addiction. Opioid antagonists are lifesaving in the face of overdose, and ongoing treatment with opioid antagonist medication can improve outcomes in conjunction with psychosocial treatment. The basic pharmacology at the Mu opioid receptor will be reviewed regarding agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists. Selection of appropriate candidates for opioid antagonist therapy will be addressed, as will different modes of delivery of the drug. Adverse effects of antagonist therapy will be reviewed, and the efficacy of this treatment modality will be examined.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Tuesday Mid-Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

310. Using Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT) as an Initial Intervention in a Residential or Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment Setting
Joseph Troncale, MD, DFASAM
Supported by: Retreat Premier Addiction Treatment Centers

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT) has been shown to be useful in the treatment of addictive disorders. The cornerstones of ACT include principles of mindfulness, remaining open to new ideas and moving toward one’s values rather than escaping one’s feelings. In short, accepting feelings rather than escaping them and moving toward values rather than toward suffering define the goals of this type of behavioral therapy. Introducing patients to these principles can be done early in drug and alcohol treatment and set the tone for ongoing therapy. This workshop will demonstrate practical techniques that can be used in any therapeutic setting.

 

311. A Recovery Model of Working with Families
Melinda G. Drake, MSW
Supported by: The Canyon at Santa Monica

A Recovery Model Approach of Working with Families in Addiction begins with understanding where the family is: understanding the patient and family members for need and readiness to accept changes in their lives; group sessions to help the family to realize that that their experiences and feelings are not unique and that they can set healthy boundaries for themselves; structured intervention to allow participants, with the support and guidance of a trained clinician, to share how the addiction-related behaviors have impacted their relationship; informal interaction with other family members (While this element may seem inconsequential we believe that it is a vital element for success. When family members share intimate information with one another they are more apt to trust and bond.); and Relapse Prevention Planning to assist the family to generalize lessons learned in the program.

 

DBT Application to Co-Occurring Mental Health and Addictive Disorders: PART ONE
Eric Schmidt, MSW, MBA

Level of Instruction: All

An interactive presentation about Dialectical Behavioral Therapy and its application to clients with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders. Attendees will learn the clinical attributes of clients with dual-diagnosis, including behavioral and neurological etiology. Attendees will also be introduced to DBT, including its components and techniques.
Attendees will be briefly introduced to what drugs are becoming prominent in certain socio-economic, age, and gender groups. Data is derived from SAMHSA, NIDA, and other local studies, such as SAMHSA’s drug abuse household survey results published in January 2009. Attendees will learn sensitivity to the disparity in diagnosing Borderline Personality Disorder.

Tuesday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

 

350. The Trauma Heart: Stories of Survival and Hope
Judy T. Crane, MA, LMHC, CAP, ICADC, CSAT-R
Supported by: The Guest House Ocala

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

I was born in October 1945 and I’m pretty sure I was responsible for the Atomic Bomb.

So much emanates about me from that opening line. Do the math I’m 71, I seem to recognize that I carried enormous guilt. What could be bigger then the atomic bomb? And I must have some resilience or coping skills because I can make light of something that sounds so huge. And perhaps you can infer that I have a strong sense of self because I can share that with an audience.

What do the stories of our clients tell you about them, their families and perhaps about you.

This presentation will offer the stories and the work of past clients, their families, their therapists and the therapeutic processes that provide a road to healing. It will provide therapeutic modalities that may be useful in your own practice.

Tuesday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 

351. Lost: Providing a Compass for Families
Adrian Hickmon, PhD

Families and other support systems often become part of the collateral damage of addiction. Individuals who love an addict often experience feelings similar to those of their loved one who is addicted. These feelings include hopelessness, fear, hurt, shame, anger, sadness and guilt. The focus of treatment providers is often focused solely on the individual in need of treatment. Meanwhile, the family may be left struggling with pain and confusion with insufficient tools, no guidance, and ample amounts of fear and resentment. The whole process of recovery can be bewildering and frustrating to the inexperienced. Addiction professionals must stand ready to accept the call for help from loved ones, not only to guide the recovery process for the addict, but also to provide guidance and help for the loved ones.

 

352. Sober and Happy
Stefan Bate, MA, LAC
Supported by: Jaywalker Lodge

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

It is now universally recognized that medical detox and primary care treatment are only the beginning for people seeking long-term addiction recovery. Countless studies have proven the efficacy of extending the treatment continuum beyond the traditional 28-day in-patient experience. While improving recovery rates IS good, miraculous even, I pose the following question: is it good enough? Is the best we can hope for in the field of continuing care to help clients maintain their recovery? Helping people in early recovery stay clean is good, but it isn’t good enough. Incorporating core life skills education, life coaching techniques, along with traditional recovery support services, into continuing care treatment programs will not only help clients stay in recovery longer but will also give them the tools and support they need to begin to build a life of their dreams.

 

DBT Application to Co-Occurring Mental Health and Addictive Disorders: PART TWO
Eric Schmidt, MSW, MBA

Level of Instruction: All

An interactive presentation about Dialectical Behavioral Therapy and its application to clients with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders. Attendees will learn the clinical attributes of clients with dual-diagnosis, including behavioral and neurological etiology. Attendees will also be introduced to DBT, including its components and techniques.
Attendees will be briefly introduced to what drugs are becoming prominent in certain socio-economic, age, and gender groups. Data is derived from SAMHSA, NIDA, and other local studies, such as SAMHSA’s drug abuse household survey results published in January 2009. Attendees will learn sensitivity to the disparity in diagnosing Borderline Personality Disorder.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:00 PM

Tuesday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

 

375. Nation Taken Hostage
Heather R. Hayes, MEd, LPC, CIP, CAI
Supported by: Heather R. Hayes and Associates

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Heather Hayes utilizes her thirty plus years of experience as a Clinician, and sixteen years as a Hostage Negotiator and Psychological Profiler, to liken addiction to terrorism. By reviewing tactical protocol used in infamous hostage situations of the past; Hayes lays the framework that rhetorically encourages viewing addiction as a terrorist, and emphasizes the hard-hitting philosophy of “zero acceptable losses.” By providing solution based strategies, we turn our efforts from an ineffective offense, to a strategic, grass roots defense. With these methods, we can RESIST, and begin taking back our communities, one family system and human being at a time.

 

376. All Bets are Off: An Overview of Female Compulsive Gamblers
Josephine Marie Tynes, MSW, ICGC-II
Supported by: Caron Foundation

Level of Instruction: All

This workshop will explore the individual needs of female problem gamblers in a therapeutic setting. Information regarding demographics, presenting problems, specific needs and barriers will be explored during the presentation. Specific attention will be paid to identification of female problem gamblers, as well as interventions and appropriate treatment for this population. Furthermore, an overview of characteristics, diagnostic indicators and problems specific to women presenting with compulsive gambling issues will be provided. Case studies will be presented to enhance understanding of the problems and barriers to treatment associated with female problem gamblers.

 

DBT Application to Co-Occurring Mental Health and Addictive Disorders: PART THREE
Eric Schmidt, MSW, MBA

Level of Instruction: All

An interactive presentation about Dialectical Behavioral Therapy and its application to clients with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders. Attendees will learn the clinical attributes of clients with dual-diagnosis, including behavioral and neurological etiology. Attendees will also be introduced to DBT, including its components and techniques.
Attendees will be briefly introduced to what drugs are becoming prominent in certain socio-economic, age, and gender groups. Data is derived from SAMHSA, NIDA, and other local studies, such as SAMHSA’s drug abuse household survey results published in January 2009. Attendees will learn sensitivity to the disparity in diagnosing Borderline Personality Disorder.

Tuesday Evening Plenary

6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

 

380. Recovery is Cheap, Relapse is Expensive: Reducing Behavioral Healthcare Costs in Emerging Adult Populations
Andrew Berki

Level of Instruction: All

We find ourselves facing an unprecedented challenge in the history of modern substance use disorder treatment. The efficacy and value of clinical care is under widespread attack. This panel will discuss root causes for the current landscape and present viable solutions to the systemic issues facing clients, their families, insurance providers, and treatment professionals. As part of the discussion we will review improving best practice through the establishment of recovery capitol in conjunction with clinical and outpatient services; discuss the utilization of medication assisted treatment in abstinence based clinical models; and develop a macro level understanding of the relationship between behavioral healthcare costs and the efficacy of treatment episodes.

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:30 AM – 12:00 PM Registration Opens
7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall

Wednesday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

400. Bridging Divides: 12 Step Recovery and Feminist, LGBTQ, and Atheist Populations
Rev. James Yoxall, MA, CSC and Leta Herrington, D Min, LPC, MAC
Supported by: The Center for Dependency, Addiction and Rehabilitation’s (CeDAR)

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This workshop presents resources, approaches, and clinical philosophy for best practices in addressing the spiritual care of patients and families affected by addiction, being sensitive to the difficulties that particular populations have including questions of gender, sexual identity, culture, and religion. Each of the presenters is experienced in providing patient-centered spiritual care in residential addictions treatment to diverse populations.

Present treatment of use disorders has developed significantly since 1939 and the publishing of the historic “Big Book” of Alcoholics Anonymous. At the same time, the ‘grass roots’ recovery community remains an important resource sought out by many individuals and families during and after formal treatment. The historical distance from founding documents is one source of tensions between clinical practice, the recovery community, and individuals and families seeking help. Questions are raised by persons representing different stances that can feel excluded or typecast by the historic recovery frame of reference.

Wednesday Morning Break

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Closing Plenary

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

 

401. Healing with Experiential Therapies
Dr. Duke Vinson, LPC,MAC, CCAADC and Dale Phillips

Illustrate how by using experiential therapies will have a an immediate positive effect on a patients treatment. Also, to understand how the use of experiential treatments can reduce the amount of medications for anxiety, depression, and sleep needed during treatment.

 

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  • C4 conferences are a part of our company's yearly schedule. We feel that you create the best conferences and we make it priority to attend as many as we can each year.


  • Great conference! Learned a lot, great networking, wonderful hotel and conference center.


  • It was a pleasure to attend a conference that is not based on placing every client on drugs to get them off drugs and alcohol.


  • I feel that I learned a lot as a result of attending this conference and left feeling rejuvenated as a substance abuse/mental health practitioner!


  • More than anything, the CORE is inspiring for us clinicians to not give up on improving our outcomes. The entire vibe of the conference is motivating!