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9:00 AM – 7:00 PM Registration Hours
5:00 PM – 6:30 PM Hors d’oeuvres Networking Reception
5:00 PM Exhibit Hall Opens – Magnolia Ballroom

Hors d’oeuvres Reception

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

Opening Plenary

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

 

199. Implementing Evidence-based Addiction Treatment in the Context of Upstream Barriers to Health (2 CE/CME)
Andrey Ostrovsky, MD
Supported by: Solera Health

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a public health emergency in the US. While certain aspects of the OUD crisis are improving, such as inappropriate opioid prescribing, other aspects are continuing to worsen, such as overdose deaths from synthetic opioids. Emerging approaches to curb the OUD crisis risk exacerbating health disparities. The presentation will describe how three opioid treatment programs in Maryland (2 urban, 1 rural) are using QI to equitably implement evidence-based addiction treatment and manage population health for a Medicaid population.

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
7:00 AM – 6:00 PM Registration Hours

Monday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

200. The Craving Mind: How Insights from the Intersection of Tech and Neuroscience Inform Habit Change and Addiction Treatment (1.5 CE/CME)
Judson Brewer, MD, PhD
Supported by: MindSciences & Brown University

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

We are all vulnerable to craving. Whether it’s a compulsion to constantly check social media, overeat, smoke, excessively drink, or any other behavior, we may find ourselves uncontrollably repeating. Why are bad habits so hard to overcome? Can we learn how our minds work, and even tap into this very process to find a key to conquer the cravings we know are unhealthy for us and open our natural capacities for awareness and kindness? In this talk, using examples from his lab’s clinical studies of in-person and app-based mindfulness training as well as data from neuroimaging paradigms, Dr. Brewer will describe why habits are formed, and how awareness helps us tap into these very behavioral and brain mechanisms that encourage habitual behaviors in order to overcome them. He will also show how we can use these to build our natural capacities of awareness, kindness, and curiosity.

Sober Living Workshop

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

210. How and Why You Should Measure Outcomes of Your Sober Living Program (1.5 NAADAC Credit Only)
TBD
Supported by: TBD

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Measuring the outcomes of your alumni post program is becoming more and more important. We can all agree on this, but how do you reach patients and gather data on them after they have left your program? It is crucial to understand the best way to gather data, and how to analyze and revamp your program accordingly.

PCSS MAT Waiver Training

8:30 AM – 6:15 PM

 

215. PCSS MAT Waiver Training (8.0 CE/CME)
TBD
Organized by: American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM)

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Waiver training is available for providers interested in seeking their waiver to prescribe buprenorphine in office-based treatment of opioid use disorders. To obtain the waiver to prescribe, physicians are required to take eight hours of training and NPs/PAs are required to take 24 hours of training. Residents may take the course and apply for their waiver when they receive their medical degree. Following the training, providers who have successfully completed the course may apply to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to obtain the waiver. PCSS urges all providers who complete the course to submit a Notice of Intent Form to SAMHSA to obtain your waiver to prescribe. The waiver must be completed online and a link to the online form will be provided to participants following the training.

ACCME Accreditation Statement:
The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Credit Designation Statement:
The American Society of Addiction Medicine designates this live activity for a maximum of 8 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Monday Mid-Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

225. Therapy “In Action” – The Healing Power of Adventure/Experiential Therapy in Addiction and Mental Health Treatment (1.5 CE/CME)
Anthony Campobasso, LCSW, CADC, CIP
Supported by: C4 Consulting

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This workshop intends to inform professionals about Adventure/Experiential Therapy and how it can be applied to various populations suffering from addiction, trauma, and mental health disorders. Experiential/Adventure Therapy has many benefits, such as how to translate vital recovery principles through hands-on metaphoric learning or to better understand the synergistic effect of the mind, body, and spirit connection. Professionals will not only learn how to facilitate ET/AT, they will experience team building activities that will enhance their own personal growth.

 

226. Treating Tobacco Dependence within a Motivational Interviewing Framework (1.5 CE/CME)
Therese Shumaker, MA, RDN, CTTS, NBC-HWC
Heather Kraling-Coons, MA, CTTS
Supported by: Mayo Clinic

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This workshop will give an overview of treating tobacco dependence including the use of pharmacotherapy. The presentation will then switch focus to discussing how to hold a conversation with someone that is using tobacco, interested in quitting, advised to quit, etc. Tobacco dependence is an addiction and is often not seen as such and this presentation will also focus on the importance of treating not only the substance use disorder but also the addiction to tobacco.

 

227. Tech Generation: Raising Balanced Kids in a Hyper-Connected World (1.5 CE/CME)
Mike Brooks, PhD, LSSP
Supported by: Austin Psychology & Assessment Center

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Our lives are becoming increasingly enmeshed with technology. While there are certainly many benefits of technology, its seductive lure has our children (and us!) disconnecting from what is most important in life – each other and the world around us. To be both successful and happy in life, it is imperative that we learn to navigate these often-treacherous waters. In this presentation, we will discuss why technologies such as texting and social media have such a grip on us, what effects technology is having on our brains, and strategies to use technology in healthier, more balanced ways. To this end, Dr. Brooks will introduce the Tech Happy Life model as an approach to manage the pull of screens more effectively.

Sober Living Workshop

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

230. Best Practices in Engaging Alumni (1.5 NAADAC Credit Only)
Chris Conners, BA
Supported by: Transcend Recovery Community

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Providing support and engaging with alumni after they are discharged from your program is very important. Our panelists will go over how they structured their aftercare programs, how they engage with alumni, and how they have created a community for alumni to rely on.

Monday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

 

250. The Role of Spirituality in Promoting Recovery (1 CE/CME)
Michael David McGee, MD
Supported by: The Haven at Pismo

Level of Instruction: All

A professional language is now evolving for addressing spiritual issue relevant to recovery in faith-neutral and faith-friendly ways. This keynote will briefly describe current clinical models of spirituality, review the evidence indicating efficacy of spiritually-oriented interventions in promoting recovery, and describe clinically-responsible and sensitive ways of introducing spiritually-informed interventions into treatment to optimized outcomes.

Monday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 

251. Stages of Change for Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Use Conditions (1.5 CE/CME)
Deb Lynskey-Lake, LCSW, CAP, CMIT, CTFCB, MSW
Supported by: Origins Behavioral HealthCare

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

Can individuals be treated successfully for co-occurring disorders and substance use disorders when they present to treatment but do so unwillingly or without commitment? Here we explore the possibilities, myths and stages of change, and successful techniques of meaningful engagement, communication and collaboration with the patient. Participants will discover through small groups and their own interactions in proposed case studies, Motivational Interviewing techniques and the clinician’s own style and practice of empathy and listening. Learn how the vital communications link between clinician and patient is forged in initial meetings. Participants will learn the efficacy of collaborative planning in individual treatment and relapse prevention. We examine quadrants of co-occurring disorders, relapse, cyclical learning and hope, and the role of holistic therapies and spirituality in treatment. The successful navigation of stages of change are presented in individualized, longer treatment and the realization of an individual’s authentic goals.

 

252. The Neuroscience in Treating Family Systems: All Humans Are ‘Chemically Dependent’ (1.5 CE/CME)
Ward Blanchard, MA, LCAS, CSI
Supported by: The Blanchard Institute

Level of Instruction: All

Dating back to early 1900s, Substance Use Disorders have commonly been referred to as “family diseases.” Likewise, in today’s addiction industry, most treatment centers tout “family program services” as a standard available provision. However, the offered family curriculum in these programs and services is often outdated, inaccurate, or lacks the most modern neuroscience data and evidence. New research has discovered the devastating brain impact families endure once they experience the trauma of their loved ones SUDs and mental illness. This presentation reviews the most groundbreaking scientific findings on the neuroscience of family systems and how professionals and treatment centers can utilize this research and new strategies to effectively engage and treat individual and their family systems.

 

253. How Technology is Advancing Care Through Improved Engagement (1.5 CE/CME)
Steven Millette, MS, LMHC
Alex Waldron
Parker Polidor
Janelle Wesloh, LADC MBA
David Whitesock, JD, MA
Zev Suissa, MBA
Supported by: Gloo, Pear Therapeutics, CaredFor, Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, Face It TOGETHER, eMindful

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This panel session will focus in the use of technology to help deliver care, to make care more accessible, extend the continuum and improve patient engagement and outcomes. The emphasis here will be on mHealth, digital therapeutics and Telehealth/Web based counseling and recovery support. Attending this session will give clinicians and the program leaders information about current and most innovative new tools to support, extend and enhance care and recovery outcomes.

Sober Living Workshop

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 

260. How to Avoid Conflict With Your Community: Best Practices on Working With Your State, Neighbors and Zoning Board (1.5 NAADAC Credit Only)
Anthony Foster, PhD, MCAP, SAP, ACRPS
Supported by: Center for Sobriety, Spirituality & Healing

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

There have been many changes in our industry. States are imposing more regulations on sober livings; different models of sober livings have emerged. Panelists will talk about the best ways to interact with communities, government, zoning boards and neighbors so that your sober living flourishes and avoids conflicts with your community.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

Monday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

 

275. Trauma Integrated Addiction Treatment: What is it? What should it look like? (1.5 CE/CME)
Michael Barnes, PhD, MAC, LPC
Supported by: Foundry Treatment Center

Level of Instruction: All

No matter who you speak to in the addiction treatment world, they will tell you that they do trauma informed or trauma integrated treatment. But what does that mean and what should that look like? This presentation will offer a developmental model and a set of axioms that can be utilized in the development of effective trauma integrated treatment. The Neuro Affective Relational Model (NARM) will be proposed as a central organizing theory for assisting clients to work simultaneously with achievement of addiction milestones and resolution of day-to-day trauma symptoms. NARM is a treatment model designed to address developmental trauma, based on somatic psychotherapy, attachment theory and regulation of the autonomic nervous system. NARM developmental themes of connection to self and others, attunement to needs, trusting self and others, autonomy and boundary setting, and the ability for love/sexuality will be highlighted.

 

276. Helping Parents of Young Adults Understand the Benefits of Leaning into Struggle (1.5 CE/CME)
Diana Clark, JD, MA
Supported by: Turnbridge

Level of Instruction: All

Whether substance use disorders are born of pain or cause painful consequences, acquiring pains’ wisdom and learning how to lean into struggle are critical components of recovery. Watching a loved one struggle without rescuing them is often difficult for parents and they seek to ameliorate pain and often engage in behavior that interferes with growth. Appropriate engagement with the family during the treatment process can mitigate this possibility and instead can create allies in recovery. The presenter will lead the group to understand this often occurring and frustrating dynamic and methods to successfully engage parents in the recovery process.

 

277. Digital Addiction, ADHD and ASD Spectrum Disorders: A Discussion of Co-Morbidity and Treatment (1.5 CE/CME)
Edward Spector, PsyD
David Greenfield, PhD, MSCP
Hilarie Cash, PhD, LMHC, CSAT
Clifford Sussman, MD
Supported by: The Center for Internet and Technology Addiction, The University of Connecticut, School of Medicine & reSTART Life, LLC

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Panelists will describe and discuss the co-morbidity of Tech Addiction with ADHD and ASD. Special focus will be made to treatment considerations when these complicated conditions collide. A case example will be discussed.

Sober Living Workshop

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

280. The Benefits of Peer Support Specialists and Recovery Coaching (1.5 NAADAC Credit Only)
John Hulick, MS
Leah McIlrath
Supported by: Palm Beach County Community Services Department & Grace Recovery ATX

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Everyone is becoming a peer support specialist or recovery coach these days. Even Medicaid is starting to reimburse for peer support. But what exactly does a recovery coach do? How can you get trained or incorporate recovery coaching into your program? Is it effective? Peer support services are delivered by individuals who have common life experiences with the people they are serving and has become an increasingly utilized intervention in the substance use disorder continuum of care. The early evidence on this emerging intervention, particularly when coupled with recovery support services, is promising and public payors are beginning to fund and reimburse for these services as a result. Defining peer support; addressing some of the intervention’s shortcomings; and, exploring cutting edge recovery capital outcomes measuring and monitoring tools will round out this panel’s discussion.

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
7:30 AM – 6:00 PM Registration Hours

Tuesday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

300. The Internet is Made for Porn: Implications of the Pornification of Human Sexuality (1.5 CE/CME)
David Greenfield, PhD, MSCP
Supported by: Odyssey Behavioral Healthcare

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

This workshop will review the roots of pornography and its long historical relationship with technology and how this marriage formed and thrived in recent decades. We will examine how pornography addiction is increased by the amplification of stimulating content via the Internet. There will be a deeper examination of the recent interrelationship of the Internet and digital technology with pornography and the implications for the use, abuse, and addiction to porn. We will address the complex issues in our culture regarding the schism between overt sexuality and sexualization juxtaposed with the covert shame, intoxication, and use of online pornography. Pornography risks normalizing unobtainable sexual feats by portraying an unrealistic and unattainable view of sexual behavior that is devoid of the intricacies and intimacies of human connection. We will also review the neurobiology of sex and pornography use, and we will explore the evolutionary biology of the hijacking of the mesolimbic pathways in process/behavioral addiction in regard to online sexual behavior and pornography. Clinical, medical, and treatment implications will be presented.

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

Tuesday Mid-Morning Workshops

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

325. Keeping Pace in a Rapidly Changing Environment: An Update for Treatment Programs and Recovery Residences (1.5 CE/CME)
Daniel McClughen, JD
Stacey Worthy, JD
Supported by: DCBA Law & Policy

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Recent headline: “The Feds Are Raiding the Offices of Doctors Who Prescribe Addiction Medication: Addiction doctors are worried about federal retribution against their treatment programs, and they’re terrified for their patients, whose lives are at risk from overdose.” The political environment, standard of care, and legal landscape related to addiction treatment are rapidly evolving as more attention has been focused on the U.S. drug overdose epidemic and as rates of abuse of drugs such as cocaine and benzodiazepines have soared in recent years. At the same time, now more than ever, the addiction treatment industry is under increased scrutiny by lawmakers and regulators. This presentation, led by two experienced health care attorneys, will provide a timely update regarding recent state and federal legislation, regulation, and enforcement trends that could impact residential treatment, sober homes, and marketing professionals, and provide best practices to stay compliant in this rapidly changing environment.

 

326. Motivating the Substance Use and Eating Disorder Co-Occurring Patient (1.5 CE/CME)
Linda Lewaniak, LCSW, CAADC
Supported by: Eating Recovery Center

Level of Instruction: Intermediate/Advanced

42.7% of those struggling with substance use disorder will also have a co-occurring disorder such as binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, mood, and anxiety. And yet, many of these individuals are either undiagnosed or not ready to confront another recovery process. There are many different stages of change when in the process of recovery: pre-contemplative, contemplative, and determination/pre-preparation. The presenter will guide the audience through motivational interviewing techniques to best support the client at the stage they are currently at in the recovery process. The tools outlined will include reflective listening, empathy, and developing discrepancies to best intervene and provide treatment options for the co-occurring population wherever they are in the process.

 

327. Changing the Game: A Contemporary Approach to Outpatient Treatment of Internet and Video Game Addiction (1.5 CE/CME)
Clifford Sussman, MD
Edward Spector, PsyD

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

In this workshop, we will introduce a treatment protocol created on evidence based biopsychosocial research as well as years of outpatient clinical experience in treating Internet and Video Game Addiction in teenagers and young adults. The approach to be discussed integrates individual psychotherapy emphasizing motivational interviewing, parent coaching, medication management as needed, and group therapy. A 3-step tangible but customizable method will be introduced to guide patients and their families on the journey from ambivalence and dysfunction to the self-regulation and delayed gratification skills required to be independent and successful at life. Patient psychoeducation and guidelines for referring to more intensive levels of care will also be discussed. Case examples and an interactive discussion will be included.

Tuesday Luncheon

12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

 

350. Left to Their Own Devices: Practicing Healthier Device Management & Professional Digital Citizenship (1 CE/CME)
Don Grant, MA, MFA, CCDC, PhD
Supported by: Resolutions Teen Center & (un)BOOT CAMP

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

Recommended for both professionals and individuals, this presentation will explore how our digitally-based devices and behaviors have-and will perpetually continue to affect, effect, and alter our lives, lifestyles, and careers. It will expose our “for better” and also (potentially) “for worse” increasingly reliant relationships with screens, as well as the applications and services they deliver. Attendees will be taught how to identify potential risk factors of online engagement for their patients, students, families, and selves, then be provided with pragmatic strategies to practice healthier device management and promote professional digital citizenship.

Tuesday Early Afternoon Workshops

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 

351. Opioid Use Disorder: The Brain’s Neurobiological Choice in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (1.5 CE/CME)
James Lewis Fenley, MD, ASAM
Supported by: SMA Health Care

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

PTSD is marked by emotional dysregulation. Opioids are potent modulators of emotional and physiological processes. With significant symptom overlap, research has found particularly high co-morbidity between opioid use disorder and PTSD. The brain initially seems to choose opioids to improve function of damaged structures in PTSD, such as the hippocampus and the inferior portion of the frontal lobe. However, as negative reinforcement begins to drive addictive behaviors and opioid use disorder becomes a stress mediated illness as is PTSD, all positive effect is lost. This presentation will review the research, the intimate relationship of endogenous and exogenous opioids to trauma and its implications in terms of assessments and clinical treatment of opioid use disorder and PTSD.

 

352. Understanding Clinical Bias and Cultural Norms in Clinical Treatment (1.5 CE/CME)
Vanina Hochman, MA, LMFT
Supported by: Retreat Premier Addiction Treatment Centers

Level of Instruction: All

Cultural competency is now a core requirement for mental health professionals working with culturally diverse patient groups. Cultural competency training may improve the quality of mental health care for ethnic and all groups. This workshop will compare and contrast cultural norms among different populations in behavioral health treatment. Clinicians will gain tools, techniques and strategies to use when treating a diverse population. Clinicians will also discuss how to assess and gain awareness of personal biases in behavioral health treatment.

 

353. Introducing Technology Throughout the Addiction Management Lifecycle (1.5 CE/CME)
Murray Zucker, MD
Supported by: CHESS Health

Level of Instruction: All

This session will provide an overview of how new technology can be introduced to radically improve the addiction management lifecycle from Intervention to Treatment to ongoing Recovery support. By employing a data driven approach that connects patients and families to a care team and new therapy modalities supporting the measurement and ongoing monitoring of outcomes, technology can change the unsustainable approach to addiction by moving it from “treatment as usual” (relying on patients to self-manage the siloed nature of healthcare) to a care team driven approach.

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall

3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

Tuesday Late Afternoon Workshops

4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

 

375. Pain is Inevitable, Misery is Optional: Emotion Regulation Skills in Pain Treatment (1.5 CE/CME)
Osvaldo Cabral, MA, LPC, LAC
Supported by: New Health Services

Level of Instruction: Introductory

Research has shown that mental health, addiction and medical pathologies prominently interface in pain disorders and create challenges in self-regulation. Emotion regulation skills play a vital role in working through the challenges for better outcomes and acceptance of the pain disorder and its accompanying emotional and mental concerns. This presentation will focus on effective emotion regulation skills used in the chronic and acute pain population for a more comprehensive treatment approach. These skills affectively target and help manage mental health conditions, distressing emotions and physical pain symptoms increasing successful outcomes.

 

376. Treating the Link Between Traumatic Experience and Opioid and Other Substance Use Disorders by Using the Somatic and Cognitive Reprocessing Approach (SACRA) (1.5 CE/CME)
Romas Buivydas, PhD, LMHC
Supported by: Spectrum Health Systems

Level of Instruction: Introductory

This session discusses perhaps the most common link between those suffering from opioid addiction and a history of trauma, and an innovative therapeutic technique called the Somatic and Cognitive Reprocessing Approach (SACRA). Traumatic or adverse life experiences can lead an individual to struggle with PTSD. That, in turn, can lead to wanting to escape from the pain of flashbacks, nightmares, and reliving the traumatic experiences. Substances such as opioids may seem like an escape from the pain, but they only worsen the situation by leading to addiction. Treating the link between trauma and Opioid Use Disorders and other SUDs with SACRA by applying somatic-based EMDR techniques followed by cognitive-behavioral based DBT techniques, may be a very useful new tool in a treatment providers toolkit.

 

377. How Advances in HIT, Devices, Sensors and Wearables are Personalizing and Improving Behavioral Healthcare (1.5 CE/CME)
Steven Millette, MS, LMHC
Jesse Wheeler
Maurya Glaude, PhD, MSW, LCSW
Graeme Moffat, PhD
Kai Stinchcombe, MA
Supported by: Gloo, Faces & Voices of Recovery, Tulane University, School of Social Work, Muse® by Interaxon Inc. & True Link

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

This panel session will focus on how advancing technology is enabling innovation and improvement in behavioral health and recovery especially around the value of data and analytics, interoperability and clinical decision support. Sensor improvement, wearable technology, and virtual reality is advancing and removing barriers to care and facilitating connection among patients, clinicians and care managers. These evolving capabilities are driving better outcomes, powerful analytics, and personalization of care essential for value-based care. Technology focused on in this panel will include data sharing, sensors/wearables, assessments, analytics/ML, and other patient and clinical workflow tools. Attending this session will give the clinician and the program leadership new information about current and new tools to improve efficacy, outcomes, and quality of care and recovery support.

 

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7:00 AM – 8:00 AM Open 12 Step Meeting
7:00 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Hall
8:00 AM – 11:00 AM Registration Hours

Wednesday Morning Plenary

8:30 AM – 10:00 AM

 

400. Change in Action (1.5 CE/CME)
Mark Pirtle, DPT
Supported by: “Is Your Story Making You Sick?” – A Lojong Production Film

Level of Instruction: All

The documentary film “Is Your Story Making You Sick?” chronicles eight people from all walks of life as they bravely confront their stories and work through a variety of stress-related illnesses including depression, anxiety, addictions, and PTSD. Like all people, these courageous participants carry the imprint of their past within their body-mind system. That imprint is their story. It determines their emotions and can even make them sick. Using a variety of psychotherapeutic modalities including ethics-based mindfulness, meditation, somatic experiencing, shamanic practices, shadow and dream work, and more, facilitators guide the group to higher perspectives, a new story, change, and healing. Expert interviews of Dr. Gabor Maté, Dr. Dan Siegel, Ellen Langer PhD, Carl Hart PhD, Bruce Lipton PhD, Dr. Lissa Rankin, Dr. Ann Marie Chiasson, Eric Garland PhD, and others, inject credible science into the narrative. Learn from the film’s program directors, Dr. Mark Pirtle and Dr. Ann Marie Chiasson. Take home an evidence-based framework for narrative medicine you can immediately use with your clients.

Wednesday Morning Break

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Closing Plenary

10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

 

450. Here, There, & Everywhere: Ethical and Legal Issues in Using Telehealth to Improve Addiction Treatment Capacity (1.5 CE/CME)
Lloyd Sirmons, BS
Daniel McClughen, JD
Supported by: Southeastern Telehealth Resource Center & DCBA Law & Policy

Level of Instruction: Introductory/Intermediate

It is difficult to discuss health care policy today without referencing telehealth or telemedicine. While the concept of technology-driven health care delivery has been around for decades, interest around telehealth has significantly heightened in recent years as technology has advanced and regulatory impediments to widespread telehealth implementation have eased. Yet, there remain many ethical and legal issues that must be considered in implementing a telehealth program. These issues are especially apparent when using telehealth in the addiction treatment setting, where the technology is being implemented more widely to reach individuals in rural and underserved areas in the midst of the nation’s growing drug overdose crisis. The presenter will discuss the telehealth landscape, explain the differences between telehealth and telemedicine, and examine the ethical issues in starting and operating a telehealth program Legal issues surrounding telehealth in addiction medicine will also be analyzed. Topics will include patient safety, confidentiality, informed consent, controlled medication prescribing, practicing across state lines, and dubious telehealth schemes, among others.

 

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  • C4 conferences are a part of our company's yearly schedule. We feel that you create the best conferences and we make it priority to attend as many as we can each year.


  • Great conference! Learned a lot, great networking, wonderful hotel and conference center.


  • It was a pleasure to attend a conference that is not based on placing every client on drugs to get them off drugs and alcohol.


  • I feel that I learned a lot as a result of attending this conference and left feeling rejuvenated as a substance abuse/mental health practitioner!


  • More than anything, the CORE is inspiring for us clinicians to not give up on improving our outcomes. The entire vibe of the conference is motivating!


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